Name Description
NAS NAS is short for "Network Attached Storage." It refers to a network storage system in which shared data is stored in a central location, using an NAS server. The NAS server contains one or more hard drives that can be accessed by multiple computers on the network. Most NAS systems allow the network administrator to configure the file sharing settings, including which computers can access the data. NAS systems are used in both business and home networks.
NAS: NAS is short for "Network Attached Storage." It refers to a network storage system in which shared data is stored in a central location, using an NAS server. The NAS server contains one or more hard drives that can be accessed by multiple computers on the network. Most NAS systems allow the network administrator to configure the file sharing settings, including which computers can access the data. NAS systems are used in both business and home networks.
Native Resolution: The computer resolution that optimizes the projector resolution. When buying a projector, you should always match the resolution of your notebook to the native resolution of your projector.
Network: When you have two or more computers connected to each other, you have a network. The purpose of a network is to enable the sharing of files and information between multiple systems. The Internet could be described as a global network of networks. Computer networks can be connected through cables, such as Ethernet cables or phone lines, or wirelessly, using wireless networking cards that send and receive data through the air.
Network-Enabled: In the home theater environment, the term "Network-Enabled" refers to a Blu-ray Disc player, TV, or home theater receiver has is equipped with the ability to connect, wired (Ethernet) or wirelessly (Wi-Fi), to a router for accessing PC or media server-based content as part of a home network, or accessing content directly from the internet.
NFC: NFC (Near Field Communication) is a short range high frequency wireless communication technology that enables the exchange of data between devices over about a 10cm distance.
NIC: Stands for "Network Interface Card." Pronounced "nick," this is the card that physically makes the connection between the computer and the network cable. These cards typically use an Ethernet connection and are available in 10, 100, and 1000 Base-T configurations.
Noise: Technically, random and non-repeatable signal in an image. In common use in digital photography, any unwanted or undesirable signal that does not convey useful information. For example, a dark frame is composed of thermal current signal, thermal signal noise (and bias). Thermal and bias signals are technically not noise because they are consistently repeatable, and this is how we are able to remove them by subtraction with a calibration frame. Thermal signal noise is random and cannot be removed. However many people refer to thermal current as "noise".
NTFS: Stands for "New Technology File System." NTFS is a file system introduced by Microsoft with Windows NT and is supported by subsequent versions of Windows, such as Windows 2000 and Windows XP. NTFS has a number of advantages over the previous file system, named FAT32 (File Allocation Table). One major advantage of NTFS is that it includes features to improve reliability. 
NTSC: NTSC is the U.S. standard that was adopted in 1941 as the first standardized television broadcasting and video format in the U.S.. NTSC stands for National Television Standards Committee and was approved by the FCC (Federal Communications Commission) as the standard for television broadcasting in the U.S. Since NTSC was originally developed without consideration for the eventual addition of Color (1953) - the implementation of color into the NTSC format has been a weakness of the system, thus the term for NTSC became known by many professionals as "Never Twice The Same Color".

NTSC is based on a 525-line, 60 fields/30 frames-per-second at 60Hz system for transmission and display of video images. This is an interlaced system in which each frame is scanned in two fields of 262 lines, which is then combined to display a frame of video with 525 scan lines.