Name Description
Hard Disk: When you save data or install programs on your computer, the information is typically written to your hard disk. The hard disk is a spindle of magnetic disks, called platters, that record and store information. Because the data is stored magnetically, information recorded to the hard disk remains intact after you turn your computer off. This is an important distinction between the hard disk and RAM, or memory, which is reset when the computer's power is turned off.
Hard Drive: The hard drive is what stores all your data. It houses the hard disk, where all your files and folders are physically located. A typical hard drive is only slightly larger than your hand, yet can hold over 100 GB of data. The data is stored on a stack of disks that are mounted inside a solid encasement. These disks spin extremely fast (typically at either 5400 or 7200 RPM) so that data can be accessed immediately from anywhere on the drive. The data is stored on the hard drive magnetically, so it stays on the drive even after the power supply is turned off.
Hardware: Computer hardware refers to the physical parts of a computer and related devices. Internal hardware devices include motherboards, hard drives, and RAM. External hardware devices include monitors, keyboards, mice, printers, and scanners.
HD: High Definition. A device capable of generating or displaying a signal with a resolution of at least 720 vertical lines (i.e., 720p). Another accepted definition is any signal containing at least one million pixels of video data in a single frame (vertical resolution x horizontal resolution).
HDBaseT: A technology that empowers plug-and-play digital connectivity between HD video sources and remote displays. HDBaseT delivers the 5PlayTM feature (A feature set of HDBaseT that enables delivering video, audio, Ethernet, control signals, and power over a single 100m / 328ft CAT5e / 6 cable) set over a single 100m cat5e/6 cable.
HDCP: HDCP stands for High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection. HDCP is a copy-protection process that can allow for specific restrictions on the use of high definition video content, such as the inability to record programs through HDMI connections. HDCP encoding is commonly used on components, such as HDTVs, Blu-ray Disc Players, and Upscaling DVD Players, that have DVI (Digital Visual Interface) or HDMI (High Definition Multimedia Interface) connections.
HDD: HDD is short for "hard disk drive." An HDD is a storage device used to store data. Unlike RAM, which requires electrical power to maintain its state, a hard disk drive stores data magnetically. Therefore, it retains its data when the power source is turned off or disconnected.

Important: The term "hard disk drive" may be used synonymously with the terms "hard drive" and "hard disk." Technically, an HDD and a hard drive refer to the same thing, while a hard disk refers to the actual magnetic platter inside the drive case.
HD-DVD HD-DVD is one of two major High Definition DVD formats (the other format is Blu-ray) that were vying to replace the DVD standard in the U.S. market. HD-DVD was supported on the hardware side by Toshiba, NEC, Sanyo, Thomson (Note: Thomson also supports Blu-ray). On the software side, HD-DVD was supported by New Line Cinema, Paramount Pictures, and Universal Pictures. Microsoft also aded its support for HD-DVD. However, in February 2008, HD-DVD was discontinued. As a result HD-DVD players and discs are no longer being manufactured, but there is still a viable secondary market.
HD-DVD: HD-DVD is one of two major High Definition DVD formats (the other format is Blu-ray) that were vying to replace the DVD standard in the U.S. market. HD-DVD was supported on the hardware side by Toshiba, NEC, Sanyo, Thomson (Note: Thomson also supports Blu-ray). On the software side, HD-DVD was supported by New Line Cinema, Paramount Pictures, and Universal Pictures. Microsoft also aded its support for HD-DVD. However, in February 2008, HD-DVD was discontinued. As a result HD-DVD players and discs are no longer being manufactured, but there is still a viable secondary market.
HDMI Stands for "High-Definition Multimedia Interface." HDMI is a digital interface for transmitting audio and video data in a single cable. It is supported by most HDTVs and related components, such as DVD and Blu-ray players, cable boxes, and video game systems.

While other types of A/V connections require separate cables for audio and video data, HDMI carries the audio and video streams together, greatly eliminating cable clutter. For example, a component cable connection requires three cables for video and two for audio, totaling five cables in all. The same information can be transmitted using one HDMI cable.
HDR: 1.) An image with a larger dynamic range than usual.

2.) A method of combining different exposures to extend the dynamic range recorded in an image, such as Photoshop CS2's HDR function.
HDTV: Stands for "High Definition Television." HDTV is a high-quality video standard developed to replace older video formats often referred to as SDTV (standard definition television). While HDTV's video quality is one of the most noticeable improvements over SDTV, HDTV includes a number of other important improvements as well.
Hibernate: If you are not going to use your computer for a few hours, it is a good idea to put it to sleep (also known as standby mode) to save power. If you are not going to use the computer for more than a day, it is usually best to turn it off. However, some Windows computer offer an option that combines the benefits of sleep mode and powering down the computer, called "Hibernate."

When you select Hibernate, the computer saves the current state of the system from the computer's RAM to the hard disk, then shuts down. When the computer is restarted, instead of going through the typical boot sequence, the previously saved state is automatically loaded into the RAM. The open windows and running programs from your previous session appear just as they were when the computer entered Hibernate mode. Basically, Hibernate mode acts like Standby mode, except the computer can be completely turned off. This is especially helpful for laptop computers, which will slowly lose their battery charge if they are left in sleep mode.
Home Theater: The term, Home theater (also referred to as Home Theatre or Home Cinema), is a setup of audio and video equipment in your home that tries to duplicate the movie theater experience.
Homepage: This is the starting point or front page of a Web site. This page usually has some sort of table of contents on it and often describes the purpose of the site.
Hot Key: A hot key is a key or a combination of keys on a computer keyboard that, when pressed at one time, performs a task (such as starting an application) more quickly than by using a mouse or other input device. Hot keys are sometimes called shortcut keys. Hot keys are supported by many operating system and applications.
HTIB: A Home Theater-In-A-Box is a system that contains most (or all) of the components in one package needed for a basic Home Theater, including all speakers, a surround sound receiver section, and, many times a DVD/CD player, or even a Blu-ray Disc player. If you are getting into home theater for the very first time and don't know what get and how to set everything, a Home Theater-In-A-Box may be a great way to get started.
HTPC: A PC (personal computer) that you can connect to your TV or home theater system to play back audio and video content either stored on the PC or downloaded or streamed from the internet. An HTPC can also come equipped with DVD and Blu-ray disc playback capabilities, as well as DVR functions
Hyperlink: A hyperlink is a word, phrase, or image that you can click on to jump to a new document or a new section within the current document. Hyperlinks are found in nearly all Web pages, allowing users to click their way from page to page. Text hyperlinks are often blue and underlined, but don't have to be. When you move the cursor over a hyperlink, whether it is text or an image, the arrow should change to a small hand pointing at the link. When you click it, a new page or place in the current page will open.